LAT Op-Ed: Parks, Gang Free, Returned to Owners

An opinion piece of mine is out in the LA Times — this one about the radical changes at Southern California parks.

Parks, by and large, are now free of gang presence. They are, generally speaking, places where families can play and relax without the fear that not so many years ago kept them away.

As I say in the piece, this mostly benefits working-class families who couldn’t use gang-infested parks near where they lived years ago.

This marks a real revolution, I think. Dominating parks was part of how gangs emerged and grew strong in Southern California.

Hope you like the piece.

2 Comments

Filed under California, Gangs, Los Angeles, Prison

2 Responses to LAT Op-Ed: Parks, Gang Free, Returned to Owners

  1. Nunya Bidness

    This is shit, you’ve now idea what a gang injunction and a sentence enhancement is? Almost 20 years ago the LAPD started to impose RICO conspiracy charges on gang members, associates, relatives and even if you had ZERO involvement with a Varrio but lived in one, wore a hoodie carried a marker and there was 3 of you hanging at your local park. You’d be jammed up for a conspiracy charge (even making the generalization calling people “street terrorists”) a mobile LAPD book and release station was parked in the center of my nieghborhood park and everyone was basically either white carded or booked and released on some bullshit charge but was really profiling and harassment to the point males between the ages of 15-40 would either change their appearance or carry a bible and would walk around loaded passing out business cards to victory outreach which was very creative when it comes to your freedom and being falsely arrested.
    Once you’ve been labeled a active, inactive, associate or even your abuelas Jack Russell terrorist and get jammed up. You’re serving an automatic 7 year sentence RICO enhancement in the CDC most likely the DA will even try and push for SHU. So another way people adapted to these new laws was to be an active gang member but just dress completely unlike anyone that could profiled as a gangmember. See you people are so sadly mistaken when u think these parks and streets have been cleaned up bc you don’t see car loads of cholos bumping ZAPP in their regals. They’re out there. Everywhere and might b standing next to you and you’d have no idea unless you were born and raised in LA and could idintify the nuances with our dialogue that is extremely hard to transition from Chicano slang to 2019 internet and text messaging editing. born and raised local speech patterns are obviously recognized. You can change ur appearance easier. This new look adopted by many is politely referred to as CHOLO-FLAUGE switch camo with cholo and go ahead and list it in the urban dictionary Sam.
    The most important message in my statement is because of the gang injunctions and police harassment families were forced to sell their homes and buy an ugly tract house in Victorville. Which use to be all rednecks and now the police are understaffed out gunned and a lot of bad shit happens out there.

    So after almost 20 years the ACLU got involved and said that ALL GANG INJUCTIONS in the entire LA county are unconstitutional and a violation of our civil rights. Unfortunately rents gone up 80% forcing people from areas like Boyle Hieghts and the Elysian Valley where you can hear lily white hipsters proudly saying they live in FROGTOWN. Um no u don’t and that brewery named FROGTOWN should Pay a tribute for their blatant and ingnorant self-appropriation of a geographical name going back 60 years which they’ve no clue. if they uttered that word back in the day you’d better b ready to back it up.
    And this Sir will explain to you how Boyle Hieghts, NELA, and OAKWOOD have been gentrified. Coincidence? I think not…

    AKA el hijo del Papa
    De La CANAKA
    AKA Ben Day-Ho party of 3
    AKA El Frijol Verde
    AKA El Gato Volador
    AKA Louis Pvtón the swatmeet pimp

    NELA13

  2. I notice the disappearance of gangs amongst Latino youth and in popular culture. What is changing.

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